Urban Wildlife

October is Peak Flea Season

 

According to a recent survey of dog owners in the Jacksonville area, 75 percent of dog owners consider their canine a member of the family, yet only 14 percent were able to correctly identify October as the month when flea population peaks.

Over the past five years, flea infestation in dogs nationwide has increased by 16 percent. Despite the growing flea infestation, local dog owners have limited knowledge about fleas and their potential impact on the family. For example, many pet owners would be surprised to learn that adult fleas represent only 5% of the flea population – the other 95% exist as eggs, maggot-like larvae and pupae hiding in and around your home. And, only 20% of local pet owners are aware that fleas can carry diseases.

We Want Your Pet Pics

"Ziggy the Shar-pei Sleeping" has inspired us to create a new photo gallery, starring your pets! Send your pet pics to mycommunity@firstcoastnews.com.

Animal Care & Protective Services Accepting Adoption Applications for English Bulldogs

Animal Care & Protective Services Accepting Adoption Applications for English Bulldogs

The City of Jacksonville’s Animal Care & Protective Services Division is now accepting applications for the adoption of 13 English bulldogs that were surrendered to the shelter as part of an eviction earlier this month. ACPS is cautioning potential adopters that English bulldogs in general, and these dogs in particular, require special and potentially expensive care.

They Aren't Bald -- so Why are They 'Bald' Eagles? | SLIDESHOW

They Aren't Bald -- so Why are They  'Bald' Eagles? | SLIDESHOW

Pictures: Bald eagles

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- Funny thing happened today at the Jacksonville zoo ...

And it's perfect for July 4.

A visitor to the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens wondered aloud why the bald eagle is called "bald" at all.

The explanation from Jacksonville Zoo Deputy Director of Conservation and Education Dan Maloney?

The explanation from Maloney? "The answer is that from a distance the animals may look like they don't have any feathers on their head. But the word is derived from an Old English term that refers to being white-headed." 

He said it is kind of a coincidence because the word sounds like "bald."

Some accounts spell the old word, "balde."

On our FCN Facebook page, we've been hearing from lots of folks who see bald eagles in the wild around the First Coast.